Who We Are

The Alaska Psychiatric Association is a district branch of the American Psychiatric Association, the largest psychiatric organization in the world.  We represent psychiatric physicians across the state of Alaska, and work collectively on their behalf and on behalf of the patients they serve.  

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Charles Frank Burgess (1952-2015)

In 1993, Charles “Chuck” Burgess arrived in Anchorage.  Between 1993 and 2001, he held multiple leadership positions at Providence Alaska Medical Center.  Clinically, he did inpatient, outpatient, CL, and community education and outreach.  He was doing telepsychiatry and working closely with primary care physicians before telepsychiatry and primary care integration entered our lexicon.  In 2001, he moved to Homer and worked at The Center (now known as South Peninsula Behavioral Health Services).  He was the psychiatrist for the southern Kenai Peninsula and Kachemak Bay.

Chuck joined the APA in 1989.  He held leadership positions including Public Affairs Representative.  He reached out to all who were interested in mental illness and mental health.  He met with patients, colleagues, advocates, community leaders, and the media ...

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Current Events in Mental Health

Fairbanks Court's Treatment of Mentally Ill Spurs New National Position Statement

In response to a member complaint about Alaska judges shackling and transporting mentally ill inpatients to court in police vehicles, the American Psychiatric Association is developing a Position Statement to guide civil commitment courts in the respectful treatment of people with severe mental illness.

For more than a decade, Alaska’s Fourth Judicial District, based in Fairbanks, has maintained a policy that requires civil commitment respondents be transported from Fairbanks Memorial Hospital to the downtown courthouse in the same manner accused criminals are transported to jail. Fourth Judicial District policy explicitly states that mentally ill patients are to be transported to “best serve the convenience of the court and counsel.” However, Alaska Psychiatric Association members have long maintained that treating disabled people like criminals is harmful.


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